Science and theology - Often the subject will be called "religion and science" or "science and religion", where the use of the conjunction and indicates an unspecified relationship. One of the field's most respected survey books remains the retired Oxford University professor John Hedley Brooke's Science and Religion: Some historical Perspectives (1991). A highly accessible, yet holding to scholarly standards, is the illustrated survey work Exploring Science and Belief (Michael Poole, Hendrickson Pub, 2007).

Questions regarding the origins of science from religion (mostly protestant Christianity) are addressed by Reformed scholar Reijer Hooykaas's Religion and the Rise of Modern Science (1972). A remarkably comprehensive bibliographic survey of English works in the history of science and religion, over its intended scope, is Science and Religion in the English-Speaking World, 1600-1727: A Bibliographic Guide to the Secondary Literature (2001) ^[1]^.

Perhaps the most notable book in the past three years is Heidi Cambell and Heather Looy's A Science and Religion Primer (2009). The survey limited to textual sources and significant concepts in Primer (2009) contrasts sharply with the hundreds of pages of essentially new material found in another recent work The Oxford handbook of religion and science (2006) edited by Philip Clayton and Zachary R. Simpson.

Further reading

  • Heidi Campbell and Heather Looy, eds. A Science and Religion Primer. Baker Academic, 2009. 224 pages.
  • Richard F. Carlson, Science & Christianity: Four Views. IVP, 2000.
  • Alister McGrath, A Fine-Tuned Universe: The Quest for God in Science and Theology. Westminster John Knox, 2009.
  • William A. Dembski, Intelligent Design: The Bridge Between Science & Theology. IVP, 2007.
  • Alister McGrath, The Science Of God: An Introduction To Scientific Theology. Eerdmans, 2004.
  • Philip Clayton, Zachary R. Simpson The Oxford handbook of religion and science. Oxford University Press, 2006. 1040 pages.
  • Nicholas Saunders, Divine Action and Modern Science. Cambridge University Press, 2002. 234 pages.
  • Richard S. Brooks, David K. Himrod, Science and Religion in the English-Speaking World, 1600-1727: A Bibliographic Guide to the Secondary Literature. The Scarecrow Press, 2001. 656 pages.

See also

Notes

  1. ? The respected historian David C. Lindberg has written about this book: width="20" valign="top" style="color:#B2B7F2;font-size:{{#switch:20px 10px=20px 30px=60px 40px=80px 50px=100px 60px=120px “ This bibliography will not, of course, be of much use to scholars interested in continental developments, in science–religion encounters that occurred before 1600 or after 1727, or in scholarship published in the past decade. But given the task the authors set for themselves, one must be astonished at their energy and dedication. For scholars focused on developments that fall within the boundaries chosen by the authors, this volume should prove not only useful for bibliographical purposes but also a model of bibliographical dedication. —BJHS 38(1) : p.107, March 2005. British Society for the History of Science width="20" valign="bottom" style="color:#B2B7F2;font-size:{{#switch:20px 10px=20px 30px=60px 40px=80px 50px=100px 60px=120px ” {{#if:| Template:! colspan="3" style="padding-top: 10px" Template:! {{#if:| —{{{4}}}{{#if:|, {{{5}}}}}

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External links