Lords Prayer

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The Lord's Prayer is found in Matthew 6:9-13 and Luke 11:1-4. "Teach us how to pray," the disciples said to Jesus. He answered by teaching them this prayer.

King James Version of Matt. 6:9-13

Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.

Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.

English Standard Version (ESV) of Matt. 6:9-13

Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name.

Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread,

and forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors.

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.

Wording

Some may not be familiar with the word "hallowed". This term simply means "to sanctify" or "set apart as holy". So as Jesus teaches them how to pray, he first addresses "our Father in heaven," and continues to pray that his name will always be set apart as holy.

Some translations use "trespasses" while other use "debts" and even "sins". All have the idea of asking forgiveness for one's sins.

For thine is the kingdom...

"For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen." This last phrase is debated by Textual scholars. Found in the Greek "Textus Receptus," which underlies the King James Version, those who believe these manuscripts are the most reliable maintain this phrase as in the original manuscripts. Modern translations prefer an eclectic Greek text taking account of the oldest extant manuscripts and question whether or not this was a later addition to the original prayer. Be that as it may, this debate does not affect any essential doctrine and should not be something that causes division within the Church body.

References

  • George Berry, The Interlinear Literal Translation of The Greek New Testament. Zondervan, 1976. ISBN 0529106329

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